Italians were voting on Sunday in an election that could move the country's politics sharply toward the right during a ...
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Angelina is a determined little mouse in a pink tutu who dreams of becoming a ballerina. Katharine Holabird and Helen Craig ...
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North Korea fired a short-range ballistic missile Sunday toward its eastern seas, extending its weapons testing as a U.S.
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As some evangelicals push to restrict civil rights for trans people, other Christians use similar sacred texts and traditions ...
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Saudi Arabia is one of the world's top producers and exporters of dates, and dozens of varieties are sold every year at the ...
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Jupiter will be some 367 million miles from Earth on Monday, the closest it's been since 1963. It coincides with Jupiter ...
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Listeners tell NPR about issues they think are supported by a majority of people yet can't seem to get through the legislative process.
Americans largely agree — at least on some basic ideas when it comes to some of our most controversial issues. Yet solutions have been stalled in Congress — sometimes for decades. We explore why.
Throughline hosts Rund Abdelfatah and Ramtin Arablouei explore the history of the filibuster and how it impacts American legislation and politics.
Many people believe that some groups of immigrants — like essential workers and those brought to the U.S. as children — should have a pathway to citizenship.
But are there institutional changes that could make a difference? We get the view now from two scholars who've been thinking about this. First, we return to Jonathan Gienapp. That's the Stanford ...
Polls show that more than 70% of Wisconsinites are worried about climate change. Robert Kraig from Citizen Action of Wisconsin discusses political inaction about the issue.